Ephemera with Giants Inside, by Gromyko Semper and George Teseleanu
To my great excitement, Jordan Levinson has just posted an independent translation of Pierre Klossowski’s Living Currency (La Monnaie Vivante) on Scribd, available for perusal and download.
The text, praised by Foucault as “the greatest book of our times” is purported to provide the missing link from Bataille to Baudrillard and from Lacan to Foucault and Deleuze. It also played a key rôle in Lyotard’s Libidinal Economy, and doubtless (though less explicitly) in Deleuze & Guattari’s Anti-Oedipus.
I’ve written a (p)review here which provides a basic outline of Klossowski’s argument, as well as touching upon the rest of Klossowski’s corpus (including his foray into painting, which occupied him from the publication of Living Currency until the end of his life).
If anyone is interested but finds Klossowski’s style of writing too abstruse, I intend to engage in a close reading of the text, delineating Klossowski’s thought in more accessible language, in addition to tying it in with other theoretical accounts of political economy (such as those of the authors mentioned above, plus the more contemporary For a New Critique of Political Economy by Bernard Stiegler). Optimally, I hope to figure out the text’s implications for the way we think about the economy & economics in general, and to incorporate these into my honors thesis on the work of Piero Sraffa (which you’ll hear more about in the near future).
(For the record, Levinson’s translation is unaffiliated with the translation by Reena Spaulings which I mention in my review.)

Ephemera with Giants Inside, by Gromyko Semper and George Teseleanu

To my great excitement, Jordan Levinson has just posted an independent translation of Pierre Klossowski’s Living Currency (La Monnaie Vivante) on Scribd, available for perusal and download.

The text, praised by Foucault as “the greatest book of our times” is purported to provide the missing link from Bataille to Baudrillard and from Lacan to Foucault and Deleuze. It also played a key rôle in Lyotard’s Libidinal Economy, and doubtless (though less explicitly) in Deleuze & Guattari’s Anti-Oedipus.

I’ve written a (p)review here which provides a basic outline of Klossowski’s argument, as well as touching upon the rest of Klossowski’s corpus (including his foray into painting, which occupied him from the publication of Living Currency until the end of his life).

If anyone is interested but finds Klossowski’s style of writing too abstruse, I intend to engage in a close reading of the text, delineating Klossowski’s thought in more accessible language, in addition to tying it in with other theoretical accounts of political economy (such as those of the authors mentioned above, plus the more contemporary For a New Critique of Political Economy by Bernard Stiegler). Optimally, I hope to figure out the text’s implications for the way we think about the economy & economics in general, and to incorporate these into my honors thesis on the work of Piero Sraffa (which you’ll hear more about in the near future).

(For the record, Levinson’s translation is unaffiliated with the translation by Reena Spaulings which I mention in my review.)